So, You Think All Interfacing is the Same?

Have you ever thought to yourself, “Hey, I’ll just use whatever interfacing is on sale, or cheapest. It doesn’t matter, right?”

Wrong.

Here’s a graphic example. For a super-triple-secret project I’m working on, I needed to apply interfacing to the back of a pattern piece. My thought process was, “I need to apply it to a paper piece, so a non-woven interfacing should do the trick.” I went to the local JoAnn and picked up a yard and a half of Pellon non-woven interfacing and applied it to my pattern piece.

To say it was a disaster would be kind. The Pellon wrinkled immediately, even though I had the heat set properly and I didn’t over-fuse. I pulled a piece of Fashion Sewing Supply’s Pro-Sheer Elegance Interfacing out of my stash, and applied it to another pattern piece (I had two copies of the pattern just in case, thank goodness!). I used the Exact Same (correct) Settings for both interfacings.

The wrinkled mess on top is Pellon. The smooth piece on the bottom is Fashion Sewing Supply.

The difference between the cheap Pellon and the professional grade Fashion Sewing Supply is stark. Imagine, if cheap interfacing gives you that kind of result on paper, what will it do to your garment? Kittens, you deserve better than a wrinkly mess. Make sure you use good interfacings. You’re worth it!

I was not solicited, paid for or compensated in any way for this post. I was just appalled at the results I got from the Pellon, and pleased with those from Fashion Sewing Supply.

Happy sewing!

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Gorgeous Fabrics

I own an online fabric store, www.GorgeousFabrics.com. The name says it all!

14 thoughts on “So, You Think All Interfacing is the Same?”

  1. Oh my goodness, I always thought the fault was mine. It never occurred to me that the problem was with the quality of the interfacing! Nice display of the problem.

  2. I learned about Fashion Sewing Supply interfacing here on your blog and it’s THE BEST, hands down. It always performs expertly, stands up over time and is the only interfacing I use now. If I don’t have what I need, I won’t make the garment until I order more and receive it. Can’t thank you enough for your expert tips you pass along!

  3. Thank you for the validation. I think there is nothing worse than Pellon non woven interfacing. It does no one any good. Now, we need to teach our newbies that professional interfacings are really the only way to go. Thanks for doing that, Anne.

  4. I used Pellon for the first couple of years that I sewed and then I saw that you and a couple of other blogs I read really liked the fashion sewing supply stuff. But it was a bit more expensive and I had to order it and yeah, I didn’t get any until recently and holy crap balls batman it’s awesome stuff. I threw all the crappy stuff I had in the trash. My good looking patterns look even better now. I can’t imagine not having it! High five Anne.

  5. I love “Fashion Sewing Supply” interfacing and have a bit in my stash. Unfortunately, will have to use it sparingly, as they don’t ship to Australia anymore :(((

    1. I wonder if it would be black market kinds of illegal to have someone from the states ship it to you. I feel like I need a trench coat just to suggest such a thing!

  6. Pellon will do the same thing on garments sooner or later, as it did to your pattern. While doing the hot water soak seems to have helped a bit, I’ve still had it bubble and the interfacing part pill and peel from the adhesive after a few rounds in the laundry. I’ve ordered from Pam but have yet to sew anything needing interfacing. Knit tops seem to be my go-to sewing these days.

  7. I also found out about Fashion Sewing Supply from here. Their interfacings are first class. I highly recommend the sample pack for those on the fence. And you don’t need to preshrink.

  8. Years ago, I did the same thing with JA’s Pellon interfacing on my all time favorite jacket pattern, an OOP Calvin Klein. I was dismayed at seeing all those wrinkles. It never occurred to me to get (have) another copy, thanks for putting a bee in my bonnet, Ann.

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